Homeis
Popular searches
Lawyers
Babysitters
Nightlife
Day Trips
Groceries
Lunch
Education
Weddings
Corona
By homeis South Asians  ·  July 25, 2019

Best Non-Hindi Films in the past 5 years

Watching a non-Hindi language Indian film can feel a bit like traveling off the beaten path. It’s like you ditched the touristy things and went local, stayed in an Airbnb instead of a hotel. Hindi cinema has dominated the popular consciousness for so long, that it has, over the years, become our default choice of movie watching. But that might be changing. Some of the coolest films made in India in the last few years haven’t been in Hindi. The fact that the highest grossing Hindi film, Baahubali: The Conclusion, is the dubbed version of a Telugu film, shows that we are open to the idea of watching a film that's not originally made in a language we understand, and that has actors we aren't familiar with. Earlier, even if the intent was there, there was the problem of access — apart from the rare screenings at film festivals, Satyajit Ray’s films hardly ever got shown anywhere outside Bengal. But today, a Tamil gangster flick is a few clicks away, thanks to digital platforms such as Netflix, Amazon and Hotstar. Just like driving to a secluded hill in Maharashtra is possible, thanks to the GPS on your phone. To make it easier for you, we have drawn a list of the best of such films from the last five years: from a Tulu language oddity, to a genre mash-up from Guwahati, to an unapologetically bonkers crime epic set in the gold mines of Bengaluru - our picks of the best regional films since 2014. Not all of them are available on streaming right now but we hope will land up on one of the platforms sooner or later.

...Read All
Dashed border
22 Saved
Dashed border
Join 156,460 South Asians in USA!

Download homeis app to discover more in your community

Want to add something?
Share your experience and add recommendation to this list.

Jigarthanda (2014) - Tamil

By Darshan
Dashed border
Stuffed with directorial swagger - the one thing we don’t get much of in Tamil cinema. I thought of Super Deluxe, but it’s too recent, too well-known. Hence, Karthik Subbaraj’s ode to gangsterism, Tamil cinema, and gangsterism in Tamil cinema. Jigarthandasubverts the hero/heroine (they do “bad” things), the villain (who becomes the most lovable character), and even the narrative, which gradually acquires a meta layer. The director seems to be saying that, in the present Tamil-cinema scenario, anyone, apparently, can become a hero and begin calling the shots, and directors with vision are forced to compromise – so the only way to make the movie you really want to make is to become some sort of gangster. It’s fun. It’s vicious. It’s brilliant.
...Read All
AK
10 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

C/O Kancharapalem (2018)

By Darshan
Dashed border
Like Raam Reddy’s Thithi, C/O Kancharapalem is a ‘community film’ in that it is largely made up of a cast and characters from the residents of Andhra Pradesh’s Kancharapalem. A wonderful blend of fiction and reality, these people are the film’s soul, offering the kind of oddball characters that you’d perhaps only find in real life. Debut director Venkatesh Maha’s C/O follows four tender love stories of people at different life stages. From the innocent purity of school romance to a widow opening herself up to new possibilities, the film explores how issues of love and marriage are treated, overlooked, disregarded, questioned and violently rejected by a society that won’t let people be. There comes a point in the film when you think it’s getting too melodramatic, but Maha throws in an intriguing final revelation which makes you want to revisit the whole thing all over again.
...Read All
10 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

KGF: Chapter 1 (2018) - Kannada

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
KGF is loud, lurid and unapologetically bonkers (at one point, the hero says: 'If you think you’re bad, I’m your dad') but it’s also ambitious, emotional and hypnotic. The film is an origin story, setting up the mythology of the gangster superhero Rocky (the actor is introduced as ‘Rocking Star Yash’). Like many great movie gangsters (Vijay in Deewar, Velu Nayakan inNayakan), Rocky learns his craft on the mean streets of Mumbai. But then, he is summoned to Bengaluru where an evil gold-mining empire has been flourishing in secret since 1951. Writer-director Prashanth Neel is a lover of slow-motion, top shots and testosterone. The simplistic and high-pitched film has only one aim – to set up Rocky as the invincible savior of the oppressed (other characters describe him as both ‘barood’ and a typhoon). There is zero subtlety or nuance here but Neel skilfully tells us an over-wrought tale of a man on a mission. Interestingly, Rocky’s rage comes from his mother who he worships but his gender politics are seriously skewed – the first time, he sees the heroine, he says: Congratulations, I love you. Hopefully the film’s ensuing chapters will fix this!
...Read All
8 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Arjun Reddy (2017)

By Darshan
Dashed border
Sandeep Reddy Vanga’s defiant outlier — as well as its Hindi remake Kabir Singh — has commanded wildly different responses from viewers, from repulsive to fascinating to everything in between and has clearly managed to tap into something. Led by an unforgettable Vijay Devarakonda, the film is a character study of a terrible person that explores ideas of toxic masculinity and aggression and, the morality of his actions aside, tries to get you to understand him. And yet, bafflingly, he remains a walking, talking, smoking, snorting, alcoholic contradiction/conundrum. It’s a film which demands a personal response and, while it may leave you confounded by its protagonist, it’ll certainly teach you about yourself. Arjun Reddy places a character, his journey and his actions in front of you and leaves you grappling with questions about what’s unfolding, what’s acceptable, what permits redemption and what defines glorification.
...Read All
AK
V
8 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Kanche 2015)

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
A rivalry between two men, based on caste and social status, extends from an Indian village to war torn Europe during WW2.
...Read All
V
7 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Pariyerum Perumal (2018) - Tamil

By Darshan
Dashed border
I looked at the films above and realised Vijay Sethupathi is in every one of them, which says something about how definitive an actor he’s been in the last five years. For a definitive film not starring Vijay Sethupathi, you don’t have to look much further than Mari Selvaraj’s powerful debut, produced by Pa Ranjith. Kathir plays an oppressed youth carving out a place of his own, through education. (This is a post-Pa Ranjith phenomenon. In films like Kadhal, the boy was content to remain a labourer.) The dominant-caste villain and his poetic death are a masterstroke. We see that evil doesn’t always have to be vanquished with weapons. Sometimes, all it takes is for good people to not be cowed down, that they stand up and resist. The closing shot is like a still-life painting we can ponder about for hours. It’s not an ending, really. It feels more like a beginning.
...Read All
7 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Awe (2018)

By Darshan
Dashed border
Prasanth Varma’s multi-genre, non-linear tale of a set of intersecting stories is a hot mess of invention and imagination. Varma’s ambitious film offers a blend of fantasy, whimsical comedy, romantic drama, horror and sci-fi, among others. The unusual debut feature feels like a first-time filmmaker’s wet dream — pouring every story and genre they’ve ever wanted to explore, all into one. From talking fish to haunted basements to magical bathrooms to touching on themes of sexuality and mental illness, Awe manages to feel personal despite its magnitude. Varma tries to do far too much, but the film’s bold, out-there storytelling and whimsical characters are exciting and keep you guessing.
...Read All
V
6 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Mallesham (2019)

By Darshan
Dashed border
Mallesham is in many ways Pad Man (a film it will no doubt be compared to for the similarities in story), done right. Raj Rachakonda’s rousing biopic is based on the true story of Padma Shri-winner ChintakindiMallesham who invented an ‘asu’ machine which revolutionized sari production to save the women of his village from dangerous, punishing work. Telling a story for what it is rather than glorifying its subject,Mallesham is the rare biopic made with honesty. It’s a small, unassuming film with an indie spirit and the beating heart of a mainstream entertainer. It's led by a career-defining performance from Priyadarshi, who has till now been largely seen as the comic relief or the hero’s best friend.
...Read All
AK
V
6 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Aandavan Kattalai (2016) - Tamil

By Darshan
Dashed border
Manikandan’s third feature is another marvellous comedy of desperation (his first was Kaaka Muttai), the story of an honest man (named Gandhi!) whose dire situation makes him dishonest. He then realises that to turn honest again, he may have to adopt more dishonest means. Manikandan and his writing team (Arul Chezhiyan, Anucharan) should hold classes for other Tamil filmmakers who want the story-screenplay-dialogue credit but reveal little understanding of these elements. Everything inAandavan Kattalai is there for a reason -- say, the conceit of leaving one’s home and struggling in an alien land, which is a steady undercurrent. And it isn’t just about the protagonist’s journey. We, too, get to journey through the dense ecosystem he’s enmeshed in. Entertainment that is about something, that says something – it’s the elusive grail Tamil filmmakers keep chasing. Only Manikandan seems to have found it.
...Read All
AK
5 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Sethupathi (2016) - Tamil

By Darshan
Dashed border
How can such a listing exercise not contain a masala movie, especially one centred on the cop character Tamil heroes love to play? SU Arun Kumar’s second film (and second outing with Vijay Sethupathi, afterPannaiyarum Padminiyum) has genuine masala moments capable of making those of us who cannot wolf-whistle feel impotent – the way Sethupathi, from a distance, dispatches the villains, or the way he wears a handkerchief mask, rides up to the man who’s making his life hell, and... But in the midst of the expected hero-versus-villain showdowns, the film is as much a chronicle of a householder who can never forget that his is a very dangerous job. Sethupathi’slast half-hour is ginormous fun, driven by the irresistible Naan yaaru (composed by Nivas K Prasanna, sung by Anirudh). When the right dose of masala combines with the right kind of music, it’s something else.
...Read All
AK
5 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Maheshinte Prathikaaram (2016) - Malayalam

By Darshan
Dashed border
Perhaps the only great recent Malayalam film to subsist on a very Malayali, almost Anthikadian essence of storytelling. A celebration of the ordinary, the film questions, and almost mocks, the primal and very masala movie need to seek revenge. It found poetry in plain-speak, making dialogues as unassuming as its filmmaking style. Never before (and never again) has a pair of Hawaii slippers played such a significant role in an everyday epic. It’s the one film I’d show to an eager foreigner, wanting to learn more about Kerala and its people. I struggle to pick a favourite scene but the one in which a kid sneaks a book into his school bag, as he sings the national anthem is what makes Dileesh Pothan our most exciting director. Even characters that appear for seconds have a way of forming their own stories in our head. What more does a film need to do to be called a classic?
...Read All
AK
4 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Peranbu (2019) - Tamil

By Darshan
Dashed border
Ram’s least angry, most moving drama is about a father (Mammootty) and his efforts to care for his daughter with cerebral palsy (Sadhana). The first half is set in the midst of nature, filled with bird calls, rolling mists, soft shafts of sunlight. In the second half, the film moves away from this Eden to the city. Paradise is truly lost. But this isn’t an empty exercise in “the big city is bad” school of filmmaking. The urban space is an extension of nature, too. It’s just that this version of nature is built with brick and cement. The most fascinating aspect of Peranbu may be in how it fills the gaps in (Ram’s guru) Balu Mahendra’s Moondram Pirai. It shows us what a well-meaning man who locks himself away with a child-woman would have to deal with: periods and pads, sanitation and unquenched female sexuality. Peranbu doesn’t preach. It doesn’t judge, either.
...Read All
3 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Angamaly Diaries (2017) - Malayalam

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
The other Lijo Jose Pellissery classic is our answer to the films of Anurag Kashyap and gang from up north. This is a ballsy film that introduced a treasure of fine performers - pork and its trade has never been the same for any Malayali since its release. It’s also a very synesthetic film in the way it appeals to the viewer’s every sense. The sights, the sounds, the smells, the feel, everything comes together to make watching Angamaly Diaries an immersive experience like no other. And what more does one need to say about the film’s unforgettable single-take climax? It’s the kind of pure cinema that can simultaneously give wet dreams to Kurosawa, Wells and Godard. Coupled with a brilliant soundtrack by Prashant Pillai,Angamaly Diaries perhaps makes it to every best film list in the country, not just Malayalam alone.
...Read All
3 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Kaasav:Turtle (2017) - Marathi

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
Not unlike Killa, the physical sparseness of the Konkan coast again reflects the emotional journey of an isolated mind. But the National Award-winningKaasav – the third of director-duo Sumitra Bhave and Sunil Sukthankar’s “mental-health” series after Devrai(schizophrenia) and Astu (Alzeihmer’s) – directly addresses the psychology of depression, the disease most romanticized by today’s mainstream storytellers. Manav, a lost, suicidal teenager, is taken in by Janaki, a long-suffering woman who sees herself in him. It’s never as simple as “they heal each other”. The unfussy symbolism aside (Janaki is a turtle conservationist: the turtle-shell metaphor is visually weaved into the return-to-nature narrative), Kaasavperceptively hints at the crippling effect of technology on a young protagonist. Manav’s cellphone is an invisible character; his contact list is full, but his head feels empty. Unlike social media profiles, his history remains a mystery – just as it should, given the tendency of cinema to paint depression as an adjective with an elaborate backstory. The turtles need to be conserved, not explained.
...Read All
2 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Kirik Party (2016) - Kannada

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
In a short period, Rakshit Shetty has not only proved his mettle as an actor, but also shown his brilliance as a writer. Kirik Party, co-written and co-produced by Shetty, which also stars him as an engineering brat in the beginning and as a Devdas kind of tragic figure in the latter half, is both funny and poignant. Although many coming-of-age films have enjoyed success in Kannada cinema, this movie feels like a breath of fresh air since it has some lovely songs and two charming women (Rashmika Mandanna as Saanvi; Samyuktha Hegde as Aarya) with whom Karna (Shetty) builds undying bonds. The other fascinating thing about it is that it’s set away from the hustle-bustle of Bengaluru; hence, it gives us a peek into the little city of Hassan and its surrounding areas. Every college film plays out like it’s a tribute to the halcyon days and Kirik Party does just that, albeit with extra doses of fun and silliness.
...Read All
2 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Ee Ma Yau (2018) - Malayalam

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
Another gem from 2018 (is there a better film year?) this is a work of an auteur at the height of his powers. Lijo Jose Pellissery’s Bergmanesque Ee Ma Yauexplores the idea of death and its after-affects on the lives of the few who are robbed by the sudden demise of a loved one. It talks about the struggles of a son as he tries to organise his father’s “dream” funeral but everything that can go wrong, does. A broken casket, a secret family, the talk of foul play and the corrupt system makes everything impossible. Yet the film refrains from any kind of sentimentality or cynical hopelessness, always finding a way to make us laugh at the man’s dire situation. Books can be written about the film’s final stretch and Chemban Vinod Jose’s performance in it, making it the kind of film that ages like wine, only getting better with age and what the viewer has experienced.
...Read All
2 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Sudani From Nigeria (2018) - Malayalam

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
It’s that rare film with an almost purifying effect; a viewer leaves the theatre a better person after watching this film by first timer Zakariya. Set in North Kerala and its maddening football culture, it has the ability to show you a place and its people like we’ve never seen before, yet everything and everyone seems familiar. What’s unfamiliar, though, is this film’s heartbreaking humaneness that finds love and friendship in the unlikeliest of places. Aided perfectly by the two women who played the protagonist’s mother and her best friend, the film made household figures of many first-time actors. It is also the film that got us to discover the sheer brilliance of Soubin, the actor. If you don’t tear up in the scene in which he speaks to the bedridden Samuel in broken English, you’re made of stone. A film that’s as comical as it is cathartic, as pleasurable as it is painful.
...Read All
2 Voters
Comment
Save
0Comments

Killa (2015) - Marathi

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
Cinematographer Avinash Arun’s achingly melancholic directorial debut understands the difference between a ‘children’s film’ made by adults and a film about children experiencing adult situations. By locating the latter on the cloudy Konkan coast, Killa manages to internalize the fragile psychological state of a seventh grader – his mental city is “downgraded” to a village – uprooted from Pune after his father’s death. Chinmay’s story, his head, is a live-action companion piece to Pixar’s Inside Out. The struggle to adapt, especially in a culture that frowns upon emotional expression, is the most overlooked conflict of most childhoods. Arun captures the sounds of classrooms and pranks and rainy afternoons through a perfectly assembled cast of young actors.Killa is so visually evocative that even today, when I recall images and scenes, the actual language (Marathi) rarely ever registers.
...Read All
1 Voter
Comment
Save
0Comments

Mayaanadhi (2017) - Malayalam

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
The only true-blue romance to make the list, this Aashiq Abu tragedy borrows from the same gene pool as Jean-Luc Godard’s Breathless. But that doesn’t take anything away from its Urban Keralite setting which captures the nights of Kochi with a dexterity you only find in New York movies. The topic of sex is explored with a rare maturity and complex understanding in this relationship drama of true equals, made better with exemplary performances by Aishwarya Lekshmi and Tovino Thomas, in that order. The film also has one of the best climaxes in recent Malayalam cinema.
...Read All
1 Voter
Comment
Save
0Comments

Court (2015) - Marathi

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
A social activist is charged with abetment of suicide on the claim that his protest song influenced a manhole worker to kill himself. Most filmmakers might have played the absurdity of this one-line plot – as a loud satire or cheeky courtroom comedy. But first-time feature director Chaitanya Tamhane painstakingly recreates the mundanity of the Indian judicial system – a curious case of cinema internalizing life rather than reacting to it. The multilingual anti-drama cleverly casts its producer as a privileged outsider (a Gujarati defense lawyer) at the heart of what is essentially a Maharashtrian ecosystem. The film wryly documents the ironies and dis-passions of a bureaucratic subculture, as if to express that the gatekeepers of human fate are also bookish government employees. The final shot – of the judge instinctively slapping a kid who interrupts his weekend snooze – is emblematic of the India that Court puts on trial. The judge, after all, goes back to sleep.
...Read All
1 Voter
Comment
Save
0Comments

Asha Jaoar Majhe (2014) - Bangla

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
An elegiac, wordless film about a day in the life of a young married couple (Ritwick Chakraborty, Basabdatta Chatterjee) who work in different shifts and meet only for a brief period during the day. Set against the backdrop of a crumbling Kolkata, Aditya Vikram Sengupta’s debut feature eschews ‘plot’ in favour of atmosphere, luxuriating in the details of domestic life: like going fish-shopping, feeding the cat, having a siesta. The absence of dramatic conflict never comes in the way of all those hypnotic sequences, such as the one in which mustard oil is poured into a sauce pan in all its screen-filling glory. Shot beautifully by Mahendra Shetty (Lootera) and Sengupta, and boasting of a sound design (Anish John) that jumps at you, Asha Jaoar Majhe is a rich, sensory experience.
...Read All
1 Voter
Comment
Save
0Comments

Fandry (2014) - Marathi

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
A teacher explains Sant Chokhamela’s verses: a person should be judged by his inner qualities, not by caste or religion. Ambedkar and Shivaji Maharaj posters adorn the village walls. The only Dalit student steals adoring glances at an upper-caste girl, while we hear an adult lament about how his hands tremble when he aims for the queen on the carrom table. An idyllic background score punctuates the boy’s days. The national anthem interrupts a desperate pig-chase sequence. The village drunk empathizes with the kid. The backdrop of Nagraj Manjule’s feature-film debut is ripe with littler tragedies within the primary narrative of a dreamy Dalit boy in a caste-segregated Maharastrian village. Fandry, which ends with a damning shot that redefines “breaking the fourth wall,” is the younger sibling of Manjule’s next, Sairat (2016). Except Jabya’s journey, unlike Parshya’s, is cut short well before he dares to become a resounding romantic tragedy.
...Read All
1 Voter
Comment
Save
0Comments

Nude (2018) - Marathi

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
Starring Kalyanee Mulay, Chhaya Kadam and Naseeruddin Shah (in a special appearance), the movie is centered around a mother who poses as a nude model for students of an art college, in order to fund her son's education.
...Read All
1 Voter
Comment
Save
0Comments

Bakita Byaktigoto (2014) - Bangla

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
A young man’s quest to make a vérité-style documentary becomes a heady trip into the heart of Bengal. The idea of his film? To interview people in the streets of Kolkata about what they think of love, that most ineffable of mysteries. As one thing leads to another, Pramit (Ritwick Chakraborty) and his cameraman, Amit (Amit Saha), tumble down a rabbit hole of whimsical characters and doppelgängers, snaky lanes and decrepit houses, and land up in a village called Mohini. This is a fairytale, that gets stranger as we go, but whose implausibility we never question, largely because of the film’s presentation as documentary footage, and the poetic eye that cinematographer Subhankar Bhar’s jittery, grainy camera casts. Pradipta Bhattacharyya’s remarkable debut feature is a triumph of low budget filmmaking. It’s also a departure from contemporary Bengali cinema’s preoccupation with English-speaking, urban-centric characters and stories. The film had a poor one-week run when it first released in 2013, and was re-released in 2014, after word of mouth around it caught on.
...Read All
1 Voter
Comment
Save
0Comments

Lathe Joshi (2018) - Marathi

By homeis in NY & NJ
Dashed border
The uneasy conflict between art and obsolescence acquires a human edge in Mangesh Joshi’s poignant film about a lathe factory worker whose 35-year-old job is hijacked by machines. The protagonist, Mr. Joshi, wears the most tragic face of nostalgia: an old-school craftsman rendered redundant by the quantitative focus of evolution. Chittaranjan Giri plays Joshi like a man who has acquired the emotional prowess of a machine – poker-faced, lost, almost emasculated, as if he were perpetually on the brink. His left-behindness is reflected in the way his immediate family – a food-catering wife, a hardware-engineer son, a blind grandmother – adapt to the technological progress of their own routines by barely registering his presence. The details, especially the metallic soundscape and spatial camerawork, frame “Lathe Joshi” as an analogue telephone stuck in a digital era. I wonder what Joshi would think if this film ever streams on the internet.
...Read All
1 Voter
Comment
Save
0Comments

Pariah Dog (2019) - Bangla